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84 Lumber collects holiday cheer for children

The pro dealer stuffs a bus and more while supporting Toys for Tots.

BY HBSDealer Staff

84 Lumber enhanced its efforts this holiday season while collecting toys for children in need.

For the third-straight year, the building materials supplier was a sponsor of the annual Stuff-A-Bus campaign in Pittsburgh, hosted by iHeartMedia’s 96.1 KISS. The initiative attempts to stuff as many school buses as possible with donations for the Marine Toys for Tots program.

The company also held successful toy drives at its Pittsburgh-area locations to support the campaign.

At 84 Lumber’s headquarters in Eighty Four, Pa., associates — as well as the public — were encouraged to donate enough toys to fill the company’s 160-square-foot “Degsy” tiny house. Dubbed “Stuff the Degsy,” the event collected nearly 200 toys ranging from bikes to board games.

84 Lumber’s Pittsburgh-area stores also held separate toy drives and collected almost 400 additional toys. The company’s total contributions were enough to fill an entire bus.

“We were overwhelmed by the response our toy drives received this year,” said Amy Smiley, vice president of marketing at 84 Lumber. “We were able to think of some unique ways to encourage more participation and get people excited about donating. We’re honored to play a small role in making the holidays a little brighter for children in need.”

This year marked the 15th Stuff-A-Bus campaign for 96.1 KISS. A record 60 buses were filled from Nov. 26–30, surpassing last year’s record of 59 buses.

 

 

 

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AWC opposes New Jersey anti-wood legislation

State senate bill looks to improve safety by limiting scale of wood-frame construction.

BY HBSDealer Staff

The American Wood Council (AWC) said it is in opposition to a bill in the New Jersey State Senate that limits the heights and areas of wood-frame construction.

The AWC, who represents about 86% of the structural wood products industry, has submitted a letter to the New Jersey Senate opposing bill S. 1261. aimed at limiting the size of wood-frame construction in large residential multi-family construction.

But the bill is backed by first responders and legislators in the state who say the legislation will increase fire safety standards in new construction, particularly through the use of non-combustible materials.

In the letter, the AWC argues that current building codes do not discriminate or favor one material over another while reinforcing the equivalent performance concept.

“Under the code, all building components are evaluated by standardized tests, and all that receive compliant ratings can be used. Engineers, architects, developers, and contractors are then given design freedom to choose among the most cost-effective materials that meet the stringent criteria in the Code. Despite what you might hear, it is erroneous to believe that, because a product is claimed to be non-combustible, it won’t fail in a fire. Fires don’t start in the materials of construction – rather, fires begin in the spaces of buildings we occupy, and into which we bring combustible, flammable, and toxic materials. The progression of a fire from these furnishings and contents to the building materials themselves, is delayed by building code design, allowing safe occupant evacuation,” the AWC said in its letter to the senate.

“The proposition to reduce certain building heights and areas has been brought up time and time again and repeatedly fails because the code already addresses the issue of combustible construction through equivalent performance. Notably, S. 1261 is being promulgated by the concrete industry to increase market share. The Build with Strength Coalition has attempted to change other state and local jurisdictions and each effort has been soundly rejected. Despite claims by competing materials, the long-established code development process works very well to ensure that state-of-the-art building code provisions are regularly adopted.

“Decisions about and adoption of building codes should be determined by local code officials, engineers and design professionals who work with these materials daily.

Additionally, the AWC urged state senators to recognize that the best building codes do not result from legislation, but rather from a process that employs the best expertise of building and fire officials, along with the building design community.

“The International Code Council provides that very process, ensuring that all code provisions are approved by these very experts employed by governmental agencies. While groups like ours participate in the process, the system only permits those tasked with enforcing the code, such as New Jersey’s building and fire officials, to approve those provisions,” the AWC said.

The bill is currently in review by the state senate and has the support of senate president Stephen Sweeney.

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RangeSafe Knobs hit the kitchen

Pinch-and-twist feature is designed for safety.

BY HBSDealer Staff

Bracey, Va.-based RangeSafe LLC, is launching RangeSafe kitchen range knobs, described as after-market enhancements to a modern kitchen serve as both an attractive addition to stoves as well as an added safety measure in the home.

The product uses a patented pinch, push, and turn design. By creating an intentional way to turn on the stove, the risk of accidentally turning on a burner is minimized. Traditional knobs used throughout the market today only require a user to push and twist. The addition of the pinch feature helps to ensure intentional stove use.

Available in two different configurations – one for pro-series (MSRP $49.99) residential kitchen ranges, and one for entry and mid-price point residential ranges – the RangeSafe Knobs can be easily installed after-purchase on most commercially available ranges.

According to the International Fire Chiefs Association, a child or small pet inadvertently turning on a burner causes 11% of injuries that originate on the stovetop. To that end, RangeSafe designed a safety knob for stoves that is both attractive and functional. Unlike plastic caps, RangeSafe knobs are designed to blend seamlessly into kitchens. An added benefit of this design is that children, normally drawn to colorful plastic caps, won’t mistake these knobs for toys.

Two versions available – stainless steel brushed metal for pro-series ranges, and durable plastic for entry and mid-price point ranges.

 

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