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Shoplifting suspect walks into police stakeout

BY HBSDealer Staff

A Bronx, N.Y., man whom police believe was stashing Home Depot merchandise in a garden center trash can — and then fetching it after the store was closed — has been arrested, according to an article on NorthJersey.com.

John Hussain, 49, was already under surveillance by store personnel when he entered a Home Depot store on May 9, put items in a black trash bag and stuffed them in the trash can in the store’s garden center. Hussain had allegedly done the same thing on May 2, returning to the store after it closed, cutting a hole in the bottom of the fence and retrieving the items. Security cameras captured the incident on tape, and police developed a description of the suspect and his car, a black Lexus.

According to authorities, police spotted the black Lexus and the suspect on the evening of May 9 outside the same store. Police set up a stake-out before closing, and at 10:20 the suspect arrived in the Lexus and was later apprehended with a black trash bag containing a Delta faucet valued at $218, police said.

Hussain was charged with possession of burglary tools, shoplifting, and criminal mischief, the latter stemming from damage to the store’s fence. Additional charges from the May 2 burglar were also added.

Hussain was jailed, and bail was set at $25,000. The Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration Department was notified and may place a detainer against Hussain in light of warrants on felonies from New York relating to burglary and theft, authorities said.

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LEED Volume program casts wide net

BY Brae Canlen

A new program by the U.S. Green Building Council may multiply the number of LEED-certified retail outlets, restaurants and hotels by making it easier for developers to get their projects pre-certified. An article in The Green Source explains how the recently introduced LEED Volume program establishes a prototype for certification, allowing such chains as Starbucks, Marriott and Kohl’s to build locations within a tightly controlled set of LEED credits and designs. These buildings, which can be located anywhere in the United States, do not require individual certification to gain LEED status. The minimum “batch” a company can pre-certify is 25. 

Proponents point to the streamlining of paperwork; supply chain efficiencies; and the elimination of costly architects, designers and consultants. One example given was PNC Financial Services Group, which purchased and stored 10 buildings’ worth of certified plywood to take advantage of volume buying.

The USGBC said it is now developing a LEED-based set of metrics that can be applied to existing buildings to improve performance and bring them into the certification stream.

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NAICS 444 shows double-digit sales gain

BY Ken Clark

Building material and garden equipment and supplies dealers had a strong month in April compared with a year ago, according to government data released Tuesday.

The U.S. Census Bureau announced that advance estimates of U.S. retail and food services sales for April were up 0.1% to $408 billion. The April figure, adjusted for seasonal variation and holiday and trading-day differences but not for price changes, was up 6.4% from the April 2011 estimate.

In NAICS business classification 444 — building material and garden equipment and supplies dealers — sales compared with a year ago were up 10.3% on an adjusted basis.

Also showing strength was e-commerce, as nonstore retailers’ sales were up 11% from April 2011.

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