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Retailer fined $40,000 for lack of emergency action plan

BY Roy Maurer

The CVS pharmacy in Red Hook, N.Y., was hit with a $40,000 fine because it did not have an emergency action plan for workers to follow if a fire or other emergency were to occur at the store. Similar violations were found in other CVS pharmacies in the past three years.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposed the fine April 8, 2013, after inspecting the store in response to a complaint.

The inspection found that the store lacked a site-specific emergency action plan. OSHA standards require emergency action plans in workplaces with more than 10 employees and where fire extinguishers are present.

“The fact that CVS has repeatedly failed to develop emergency action plans is disturbing,” said Kimberly Castillon, OSHA area director, in a media statement. “Hazards can vary from location to location, so it is imperative that each store has and maintains an effective emergency action plan specific to that store.”

OSHA issued CVS a repeat citation, which applies to an employer that has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the past five years.

OSHA had cited CVS in 2010 and 2011 for similar hazards at stores in Bridgeport, Conn., and Providence, R.I.

“Hazards such as this can be prevented if employers implement and maintain an effective illness- and injury-prevention program in which management and employees work together to identify and eliminate hazardous conditions,” said Robert Kulick, OSHA regional administrator, in a media statement.

OSHA provides an interactive eTool on its website to aid management in emergency plan implementation.

The Red Cross also offers a free preparedness program to businesses through Readyrating.org. Companies may access this resource to establish or refine their emergency action plan.

Roy Maurer is an online editor/manager for SHRM. Follow him on Twitter @SHRMRoy.

©2013 SHRM. All rights reserved. 

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Sales and earnings decline for Simpson

BY Ken Clark

Pleasanton, Calif.-based Simpson Manufacturing Co. reported net sales for the first quarter ended March 31 decreased 2.6% to $154.5 million. 

The company had net income of $4.8 million for the first quarter of 2013 compared with net income of $7.2 million for the first quarter of 2012. 

The company said it continues to invest in its strategic initiatives, such as an expanded offering of concrete and reinforcing products and systems, particularly specialty chemicals, and in its truss plate and software offerings.

The decrease in the company’s first-quarter 2013 net sales was primarily due to lower sales in Europe, which were affected by difficult economic conditions. In addition, net sales were also affected negatively by reduced home center sales, lower selling prices and inclement weather in some regions of the United States, Canada and Europe, which possibly delayed construction projects during the quarter.

North America net sales were flat in the first quarter of 2013, compared with the first quarter of 2012, with inclement weather delaying construction projects in regions of the United States and Canada.

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Currey & Company recalls chandeliers

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Currey & Company of Chico, Calif., announced a recall of 10 models of its chandeliers.

Defective wiring can conduct electricity to the Chinese-made chandeliers’ metal parts, posing an electric shock hazard to consumers, according to a release from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

About 2,100 of the crystal or metal chandeliers were sold in the United States and 100 in Canada. They were sold in various colors and measure approximately 21 inches wide and 55 inches high. The model name is on the exterior of the shipping carton. Item numbers are printed on a white label on the interior of the chandeliers’ canopy.

No injuries have been reported.

Sold at: Home furnishing stores, lighting centers and by interior decorators nationwide, online at lightingdirect.com and Amazon.com, from January 2010 through February 2013 for about $500 to $3,250.

The manufacturer is YQF Lighting Manufacturer Co. of China.

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