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Philips LED 100-watt equivalent bulb first to be Energy Star-qualified

BY HBSDealer Staff

Philips has announced that its LED 100-watt equivalent bulb, the Philips LED 22-watt, is now Energy Star-qualified. Designed to replace a 100-watt incandescent bulb while reducing energy consumption by more than 75%, the LED 22-watt offers a light output of about 1,800 lumens. 

The bulb is the first LED 100-watt equivalent to achieve Energy Star qualification.

The Philips LED 22-watt offers a warm 2700K color temperature that mimics the light output of conventional bulbs. Next-generation, high-power LUXEON LEDs, developed specifically to support the 100-watt innovation, enable the bulb to exceed the Energy Star performance criteria, which require that the lamp deliver at least 1,600 lumens, a color rendering index (CRI) of 80 and a rated life of 25,000 hours. The Philips LED 22-watt also fits into existing fixtures and works with standard dimmers.

"The Philips LED 22-watt bulb is the next natural addition to an LED retrofit portfolio that already offers 88 Energy Star-rated products, ensuring that our customers are getting a product that delivers the quality and innovation they have come to expect from us," said Ed Crawford, general manager of Lighting Systems and Lamps for Philips. "Once again we have demonstrated that customers do not have to wait for alternatives to incandescent bulb or sacrifice their light output or quality because LED technology can deliver real business benefits without compromise."

The new Philips LED 22-watt is dimmable and has a rated life of 25 times longer than a standard incandescent bulb.

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Supreme Court rules for Whirlpool

BY Ken Clark

A Supreme Court ruling came down on the side of Whirlpool, as the highest court sent a class-action case back to appeals court for reconsideration. 

At issue was the class-action status of the case brought against the appliance maker.

The Supreme Court’s ruling, which came down Monday, was related to another class-action ruling that dealt with a case involving a class-action suit filed against Comcast. 

In Whirlpool’s case, a class-action lawsuit was organized on the behalf of consumers who claimed the products emitted unpleasant odors.

 

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Home Depot settles VOC suit

BY Ken Clark

The Home Depot said it reached a tentative agreement in March to settle California lawsuits related to the sale of paints and coatings.

The company’s recent 10-k filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission report followed up on 2010 allegations that the retailer sold products in three California counties and Los Angeles that exceeded the level of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) under the rules of the South Coast Air Quality Management District.

The allegations led to lawsuits in June 2011, one from the SCAQMD that sought $30 million in penalties and relief.

According to Home Depot’s filing: "In March 2013, we tentatively reached a joint settlement agreement to resolve these actions for an aggregate of $6.9 million, plus $1.1 million in fees and costs. The settlement requires the approval of the trial court."

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