News

PACOA joins Distribution America

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Port Washington N.Y.-based wholesale distributor PACOA will be joining Distribution America. PACOA serves independent hardware, paint and lumber retailers throughout much of New York, New England, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. 

Distribution America’s board of directors voted unanimously on the addition. Recently, Distribution America lost Emery-Waterhouse to Ace Hardware.

According to Dave Christmas, president of Distribution America, “Adding PACOA as a member gives us the opportunity to consolidate vendor programs and strengthen the buying power of both PACOA and the DA members. The goal is to have a cohesive group of regional distributors who through the sharing of ideas, best practices, and buying power, help the independent retailer compete more effectively in today’s complex marketplace. PACOA is a great fit for our organization and all of our Members are enthusiastic about the addition to our group.” 

PACOA will have full access to all of Distribution America’s buying, marketing, advertising and retail profitability programs. Steve Geismar, president of PACOA, said the combination of national buying power and retail solutions available will “better equip us with the strategic tools we need to continue to grow our business, and keep our customers relevant in their local markets.”

Family-owned PACOA has been serving independent dealers in the Northeast for more than 40 years.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How concerned are you that a trade war could hurt your business?
News

A retail veteran sees changes ahead

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Cologne, Germany — John Herbert has a front row seat on the global home-improvement retailing scene. The former president of EXPO Design Center West Coast (USA) and the current general secretary of the European DIY-Retail Association, Herbert identified six major changes facing retailers in 2014.

Speaking at the Presidents Council 2014 VIP Retail Trends event here at the International Hardware Fair, Herbert’s six changes describe an industry where brands — both private-label and national — play an increasingly important role in a world of smaller stores with larger online presences. 

The list of six major changes to expect in his view, begins with the concept of click and collect. "Armchair shopping is exploding," he said. "This is really a major revolution."

That revolution is forcing the hand of brick-and-mortar stores to step up their game or face irrelevancy. Faced with the threat of losing customers to the Internet, "The stores of the future are going to be much, much more exciting," Herbert said. 

Brands will play an increased role in retail strategy, both the national brands and private labels. "In the future, there will be no alternatives — store brands will become stronger, and own brands will become stronger."

Rounding out the list of major trends at retail are the movement to design smaller store footprints, and the movement to embrace mobile retailing. 

An outspoken admirer of the United States hardware retailing industry, Herbert pointed to stats showing the United States, with 9% of the world’s population, has 60% of the DIY market. U.S. home improvement retailers are "miles ahead of the rest of the world," he said.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How concerned are you that a trade war could hurt your business?
News

European forecast: Optimistic and wobbly

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Cologne, Germany — European economists have a new phrase to describe their expectations for future growth. Out of fashion is "cautiously optimistic." In fashion is "moderately positive, but wobbly."

At least that’s how Dr. Alexander Bursch, director of research at Deloitte Germany, described his economic forecast for Europe. In a presentation here at the Presidents Council Retail Trends event during the Internationale Eisenwarenmesse (International Hardware Fair), Bursch added his voice to the chorus calling for a recovery for both Europe and the United States. He also pointed to the U.S. situation as a model for how that recovery might play out. 

The question on the table was "After the Great Recession, what’s next for Europe?" The short answer: slow growth of 0.7% to 1.2% in 2014. 

One difficulty, however, in predicting Eurozone growth is the disparate economies across the continent. Spain, Ireland, Portugal and Italy trail in growth and employment, while Poland, Germany and Austria lead the way. 

Across Europe, a 12% to 13% unemployment rate is unprecedented, plus it rises to about 25% in crisis countries. The recovery will be aided by reforms in Eurozone crisis countries that are gaining traction. Still, it will be "wobbly." 

"Don’t expect a rubber band that springs back," he said. "It will be moderate, step-by-step recovery."

Lessons from the U.S. recovery are likely to play out in Europe, he said. Chief among them is the concept that Americans turned increasingly to lower-priced products and brands, and found them to be better than they expected. 

Post-recession, he expects consumers will stick to lower price points, shop with less brand loyalty and generally avoid risk where possible — saving more and using the credit card less. 

"Consumers will start spending money again — but more cautiously," he concluded.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How concerned are you that a trade war could hurt your business?