HARDWARE STORES

OSH delisted: End of a brief era

BY HBSDealer Staff

The Orchard Supply Hardware brand will carry on as a division of Lowe’s, but the ticker symbol will not.

The NASDAQ Stock Market removed Orchard’s class A common stock from listing on the market Wednesday, marking the end of a brief era for the OSH ticker symbol.

After the San Jose, Calif.-based retailer spun off from Sears Holdings in June 2011, its shares hit the market in January 2012. On day one, shares of OSH closed at $23.55. About 16 months later, the share price was $0.30. “Orchard expects that the company’s equity holders will experience a complete loss of their investment as a result of Orchard’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings,” the company said in a press release Wednesday.

Back in February of 2012, CEO Mark Baker described the retailer’s mid-size store layout (42,000 sq. ft. to 75,000 sq. ft.) as a sort of merger between big store breadth of product and small-store service to customer. “We’re not a small big box, but a really big small box,” he said.

But losses mounted. The company had earnings of $8.7 million in 2010, but swung to a net loss of $118.4 million in 2012.

Orchard’s class A common stock will continue to trade on OTC Markets under the symbol OSHWQ.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How concerned are you that a trade war could hurt your business?
HARDWARE STORES

Nebraska hardware vet celebrates 70-year run

BY HBSDealer Staff

Not paying attention to big-box competitors seems to have worked out well for 85-year-old Walt Wenzl, who recently celebrated his 70th year working for Wenzl Hardware Store in Nebraska City. He has owned and operated the independent hardware store since 1954, the Lincoln Journal Star reported.

More than 200 people gathered to celebrate the landmark anniversary at Wenzl Hardware. Wenzl has built up a loyal following over the years thanks to strong community ties and a knack for idiosyncracy.

Built 149 years ago, the two-story building is a relic in itself, still featuring a vintage hand-operated elevator and a collection of antiques lining the top shelves. The mini museum includes a 1903 Flexible Flyer sled, butter churn, pleat-making device and Wenzl’s old baseball mit and smoking implements.

As of yet, Wenzl has no plans to retire. "I’ve been here 70 years, and I’ve enjoyed it," he told the news source. "It keeps me out of the beer joints."

 

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How concerned are you that a trade war could hurt your business?
HARDWARE STORES

A brighter outlook for mom and pops

BY HBSDealer Staff

In a slight reversal from the dominant narrative concerning big-box stores and their smaller competitors, independent hardware stores are seeing a bit of a revival across the United States as the economic outlook begins to brighten for the industry.

According to an IBISWorld report released in February, industry revenue has declined at an annualized rate of -0.4% over the last five years. However, IBISWorld estimates that revenue will finally trend toward the positive in 2013 at a growth rate of 2.0%, in addition to a 16.5% jump in consumer sentiment.

The report tempered the optimism a little by cautioning that though revenues were expected to grow and lift the tides of all boats, the overall number of firms operating in the industry is still expected to fall due to competition from big-box stores.

"The recovering housing market and increased spending on home improvement projects will help boost industry demand," said IBISWorld analyst Sean Windle. "Revenue growth and profit will remain low, however, because of continuing competition from home improvement stores and online retailers."

Despite the enduring problems this level of competition creates for smaller shops, Windle said that many independent stores have weathered the changes successfully by diversifying product lines and changing floor plans.

Small business owners interviewed by Philly.com maintained that their service and deep knowledge of the industry separated them from their corporate cousins. According to the source, small businesses that do not have the wherewithall to expand physically are offering services that respond to the needs of their local market.

Nick Sprowls, former owner of Sprowls Country Hardware in Claysville, Pa., was not one of the luckier mom-and-pop owners, but his experience is a testament to the gap in satisfactory service from big-box competitors, according to Observer-Reporter.com. The 122-year-old store officially shut down this year on April 30, but Sprowls had built a loyal following despite his inability to compete with stores like Home Depot and Lowe’s.

"They nickel-and-dime you to death," Sprowls told the news source. "They go to Lowe’s and spend 400 bucks on a project, and then they come here to buy a three-dollar fitting off of you, and you have to spend a half-hour explaining to them how to hook it up because nobody at Lowe’s could."

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How concerned are you that a trade war could hurt your business?