LUMBERYARDS

Obit: Duane Swanson of Raymond Building Supply

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Duane Swanson, the president and CEO of Raymond Building Supply in Fort Meyers, Fla., died on March 8 from complications of a series of strokes, according to an article in the News Press. He was 71 years old.  

Swanson bought Raymond Building Supply from a broker in 1978 when it was a single lumberyard and grew the business to eight locations in southwest Florida.

Although not an athlete himself, Swanson was a generous contributor to local high school and college athletic programs and facilities, including baseball, football and soccer.

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Reno lumberyard to close

BY HBSDEALER Staff

B&C Builders, a 38-year-old lumberyard in Sparks, Nev., is closing on March 31, according to an article in the Reno Gazette Journal

The owners said that a lack of construction has forced them to shutter their doors. The company has about $250,000 to $275,000 worth of inventory, which it may dispose of through a liquidation sale or an auctioneer.

Both owners wanted to get out of the business before they had to declare bankruptcy.

"We were both born and raised in this town," Randy Blackwell told the newspaper. "We can’t start filing bankruptcy and all that kind of stuff and be able to walk around this town. We’re connected to too many people, way too many."

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Builder confidence up one point

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Builder confidence in the market for newly built, single-family homes improved by one point in March to 17 on the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI). This is the highest level since May 2010, when the survey period corresponded with the final days of the federal home buyer tax credit program. 

"While many home buyers are still holding off on making a purchase, builders did indicate slightly increased optimism about the future with a two-point gain in the HMI component gauging sales expectations for the next six months," said NAHB chief economist David Crowe. "In fact, prevailing indicators portend some improvement in the overall economy, which should generate modest housing market gains later this year. 

“Unfortunately, most small builders report that they are no more able to obtain credit for new construction today than they have been in the past year, and this is a major impediment that is keeping them from putting their crews back to work,” he added.

The NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index gauges builder perceptions of current single-family home sales and sales expectations for the next six months as "good," "fair" or "poor." The survey also asks builders to rate traffic of prospective buyers as "high to very high," "average" or "low to very low." Scores from each component are used to calculate a seasonally adjusted index where any number over 50 indicates that more builders view sales conditions as good than poor. 

Two out of three of the HMI’s component indexes were unchanged in March, including the component gauging current sales conditions, which held at 17, and the component gauging traffic of prospective buyers, which held at 12. The component gauging sales expectations in the next six months rose two points to 27, its highest level since May 2010.

Regionally, HMI results were mixed. The Northeast posted a one-point decline to 20, the Midwest was flat at 12, the South gained two points to 20, and the West gained four points to 17. 

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