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More executive promotions announced at Lowe’s

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Mooresville, N.C.-based Lowe’s announced a variety of executive promotions, including a replacement for the post vacated by Robert Gfeller Jr., who was recently promoted to executive VP merchandising.

Troy J. Dally has been promoted to Gfeller’s old job, senior VP and general merchandising manager-hardlines/building products. Dally joined Lowe’s in 1999 and has served as merchandising VP millwork for nearly five years, following seven years in other areas of the building materials division. He has nearly 20 years of home improvement experience.

Also today, Lowe’s announced Maureen K. Ausura was promoted to executive VP human resources, having served as senior VP in the same capacity since joining the company in 2005. She oversees all aspects of human resources, including employee recruitment and benefits for Lowe’s approximately 238,000 employees in North America. Ausura has more than 25 years of human resources experience.

Gaither M. Keener has been promoted to executive VP, general counsel, secretary and chief compliance officer, having served as senior VP in the same capacity since 2006. He began his career at Lowe’s in 1985. Keener directs and determines all legal and compliance matters for the company and its subsidiaries.

Ausura and Keener will continue reporting to Robert A. Niblock, chairman and CEO.

Lowe’s announced two other promotions: 

• William L. (Leroy) Allen has been promoted to senior VP logistics, replacing Rick D. Damron, who was recently promoted to executive VP store operations. Allen joined Lowe’s in 2003 as VP logistics flow and support and served more recently in the corporate supply chain organization as VP logistics planning and forecasting.

• Everett B. (Britt) Dayton has been promoted to senior VP IT business management, after previously serving in store operations support as VP store delivery fleet operations. In his new role, he will work across Lowe’s business areas on IT strategy, architecture, program management and prioritization to ensure successful delivery of technology to support the company’s business objectives. Prior to joining Lowe’s in 2003, Dayton worked for more than 20 years in retail supply chain development and information systems.

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From Youngstown, garden gloves for women

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Youngstown Glove Co. introduced a Women’s Garden Series, described as form-fit to the shape of a woman’s hand with longer fingers and a more slender palm.

The 11-year-old company, based in Agoura Hills, Calif., offers the gloves in pink or burgundy. High-tech features include a one-piece back-of-hand made of nylon with a moisture-wicking outer layer. 

In announcing the product introduction, the company’s press release stated its case for a line specifically for women: "Youngstown knows women perform hard work just like men do. They also know their hands are built differently than a man’s." 

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California fines Target $22.5 million

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Discount retailer Target Corp. has agreed to pay the state of California $22.5 million to settle accusations that its stores dumped hazardous chemicals over a number of years, according to a tentative agreement filed in Superior Court in Alameda County.

Target admits no wrongdoing in the settlement, which is part of a crackdown on big-box retailers by California prosecutors. Both Home Depot and Walmart have been hit with multimillion-dollar fines in recent years for environmentally related violations.

In Target’s case, the prosecutors claim that store employees in multiple locations improperly stored, transported and disposed of bleach, paint, pesticides, batteries, light bulbs and other hazardous materials, including pharmaceuticals. These violations were often motivated by cost savings, according to the state attorney general’s office. Chemicals returned by customers or found to be defective were poured down the drain, tossed into dumpsters and trucked to landfills not equipped for hazardous waste, prosecutors claim.

In one case, according to court documents, pool chemicals poured into a trash compactor reacted with other chemicals and caused noxious fumes, resulting in an evacuation of the building transportation of several people to local hospitals.

The investigation began in 2005 after Target, which operates 236 locations in the state, was hit with repeated violations of California’s hazardous waste disposal laws. A complaint was filed in 2009 by then Attorney General Jerry Brown, who now serves as California Governor, joined by district attorneys and city attorney throughout the state.

In the tentative settlement, now under Attorney General Kamala Harris, Target has agreed to pay settlements to 20 of these prosecutorial offices, plus fines to various environment, health and safety agencies. The total bill, if approved by the court at a March 2 hearing, will come to $3.4 million.

Additionally, Target has agreed to implement a statewide program to comply with regulations governing hazardous waste disposal, provide better training for its employees on how to comply with these laws and hire an independent auditor to check compliance for three years.

In a statement released to the media, Target said it has “a comprehensive program to ensure [that] our handling, storage, disposal and documentation of hazardous materials complies with California law. We train our store teams regularly as part of this program. We will continue to devote substantial resources in order to remain a responsible corporate steward of the environment."

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