LUMBERYARDS

Mead Lumber grows in Nebraska, S.D.

BY Brae Canlen

Mead Lumber, the regional LBM chain with locations in seven Midwestern states, has purchased four locations of Fullerton Building Center, according to an announcement on its website.  

The stores are located in Yankton, S.D., and Vermillion, Winner, and Norfolk, Neb. Fullerton will still operate its lumberyards in Iowa, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

“The geographic location and size of these stores make them a great fit for Mead Lumber’s growth plans,” said Craig Bradshaw, president of Mead Lumber.

Founded in 1910 by Morton Mead in Ashland, Neb., Mead Lumber is now headquartered in Columbus, Neb. Ranked 34th on the HCN Pro Dealer Scoreboard, the company operates 35 lumberyards, truss plants, hardware stores and mill shops in Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Wyoming. Annual sales in 2010 were estimated at $104 million.

Mead Lumber has also recently purchased Sonny’s Ace Hardware of Canon City, Colo., as well as another hardware store location in Pierre, Colo., through its Knecht Home Centers division.

Bradshaw told the Yankton Press and Dakotan, “We’ve been very fortunate during these times and have had some great opportunities to acquire some good retailers. We plan to continue to grow, and we’re actively still looking at other stores.”

 

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Aldrich Lumber to make way for federal courthouse building

BY Brae Canlen

Aldrich Lumber, a fixture in Billings, Mont., since 1937, is relocating to the edge of town and downsizing its business into a specialty dealer of pole barns and riding arenas, according to an article in the Billings Gazette.

The Aldrich family has been in the lumber business since 1917, when the grandfather of the current owner, Greg Aldrich, bought lumber companies in Wyoming and Montana.

Aldrich Lumber will soon be razed and the site used for a $30 million, five-story government building. The building will serve as office space to the downtown federal courthouse now under construction.

The Boyer Co. of Salt Lake City will be in charge of both building projects and intends to work throughout the winter. Some 400 federal employees who now work at the James F. Battin Courthouse in Billings must move because of asbestos problems.

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At PDIS: Conversations with award winners

BY Ken Clark

One lumber executive was from the Washington, D.C.-area. Another was based in San Marcos, Texas. One ran six units, the other 83, but they both share a common award — the Home Channel News Pro Dealer of the Year award.

During an educational session at the 2011 ProDealer Industry Summit, Gaithersburg, Md.-based TW Perry CEO Michael Cassidy and Meagan McCoy Jones of McCoy Building Supply led an informal discussion about best practices and the forces shaping the industry. Six-unit TW Perry received the HCN Pro Dealer of the Year award for 2011; while McCoy’s accepted the award in 2009.

Here are some of the highlights from the presentation:

On Confidence and the overdue housing market recovery:

Michael Cassidy: "No matter what the national numbers are, the local numbers matter a lot more than the national numbers. Locally, I wish the numbers were better, but I’m confident because my team will find a way to make our numbers better. They’ve done that year after year."

Meagan McCoy Jones: "We expect a little increase next year in terms of sales. And some of that is we see some opportunity. Those of us who are here — it has been a hard-fought battle, and unfortunately, not everybody has been able to make it. So we are seeing consolidation in some of our markets, and we’re about to benefit from some of the opportunities."

On employee moral in tough times:

McCoy Jones: "It’s interesting. We haven’t been in a position to pay out bonuses, for example, for some years, or to give some hourly employees 40 hours or overtime. Now, all of a sudden, the very inexpensive factor of gratitude becomes even more valuable. We spend a lot of energy trying to be grateful. Walking the store, thanking the people personally for the real sacrifices they’re making. It’s easy for me to give my lifetime for something with my name on it. It’s a lot harder to give your lifetime to something that doesn’t have your name on it, but you hope somebody is looking out for you."

Cassidy: "We went through some pain in ’08 and ’09 and we trimmed back a little bit, but then we guaranteed employment for everybody. We made everybody take a 5% pay cut, and the ownership took a 25% pay cut. … We personally interact with all the people. We act as coaches and mentors to them on all levels. Of our 309 employees; I can probably name 280 of them. Of the 280, I can probably tell you something significant about 200 of them. We run it as a family, and we treat people that way. We don’t lose people." 

On housing markets and divine intervention:

Jones: "I think maybe God did bless Texas."

Cassidy: "God looks down on D.C., too. Just in a different way."

Final thoughts:

Cassidy: "I think the fundamentals support our industry. We help people build houses, and everybody wants a house. There are more people in this country this morning than there were last night. What we do is very valuable to the country and the nation — we should recognize that."

McCoy Jones: "You’re not in the lumber business because you want to be a zillionaire. You would get out and do something else. We’re in it because we love it, and it’s our legacy."

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