LUMBERYARDS

Mead lumber to acquire Truss Craft

BY Ken Clark

Mead Lumber has signed an agreement to purchase the Truss Craft division of Dakota Craft Inc., a Rapid City, S.D.-based chain of component manufacturing plants. The purchase price was not disclosed.

Truss Craft serves the southeastern Wyoming building community. The acquisition will give Mead a leading market share in Wyoming, according to the announcement. The transaction is expected to be completed by Jan. 31, 2012.

“Further developing our market position in Cheyenne, Wyo., one of the country’s healthiest markets, has been a goal of ours for some time now,” said Craig Bradshaw, president of Mead Lumber. “Being able to combine the resources of Mead Lumber and Truss Craft is a rare opportunity.”

Dakota Craft will continue its operations in Rapid City, S.D., where it holds a leading market-share position. Dakota Craft offers structural components and building materials to the western North Dakota and South Dakota, southeast Montana and northwest Nebraska building community.

Mead now has 36 lumberyards, truss plants, hardware stores and mill shops in Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Wyoming. With $104 million in annual revenues, the Columbus, Neb.-based firm ranked 34th on the 2011 Pro Dealer Scoreboard.

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d.jones says:
Feb-27-2012 11:32 pm

It's creative and
It's creative and constructive, I think I've discovered a new hobby. I have an obsession on turning old objects into practical or artful objects and it looks like I am in the right spot to learn some new things. Do you have articles here on Builder Long Island, I'd be really interested din those too.

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LMC announces new Texas member

BY Ken Clark

Red River Lumber in Texarkana, Texas, recently joined LMC’s network of independent lumberyards. 

Described as a diversified building materials retailer, Red River Lumber is comprised of two traditional contractor-oriented lumberyards complemented by a 20,000-sq.-ft. showroom known as "The Design Center." The showroom features flooring, granite, doors and windows, appliances, fireplaces and custom cabinetry. The dealer is also a distributor of Overhead Door Co. garage doors.

Founded in 1992, Red River is owned and operated by Mike Craven, president.  

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Harvard housing researchers take builders to task

BY Brae Canlen

U.S. home builders were immensely profitable during the housing boom but did little to improve the efficiency of their operations, according to a book just released by the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Research. In “Bigger Isn’t Necessarily Better: Lessons from the Harvard Home Builder Study,” university professors and researchers examine the period of housing growth between 1999 and 2004, relying on a detailed survey of large home builders. What they found, the authors said, is that builders were more focused on growing their companies than improving their products and operating procedures. 

“Large home builders were very effective at attracting capital for expansion, assembling favorable land positions and developing a consistent corporate brand,” said Kent Colton, a senior fellow at Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies. “However, since much of the growth over this period was through acquisitions, there was little opportunity to fully integrate them into practices and procedures of the parent company.”

The home-building industry still has gains it can realize from improving basic on-site building operations, the researchers concluded. The book exams the experience of companies in other industries, from autos to computers to retail, to provide insight into how American home builders might better cope with operational challenges going forward. 

“Many other industries have faced these same challenges,” said David Weil of the Boston University School of Management. “Home building is an unusually decentralized industry, and for that reason typically has not been a leader in implementing new innovations. Still, there has never been a more important time to introduce new practices into this industry.” 

“Bigger Isn’t Necessarily Better: Lessons from the Harvard Home Builder Study,” is available through Amazon.com and Lexington Books.

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