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Johnson Lumber now offers prefinished wood

BY Brae Canlen

Johnson Lumber Co., a sawmill in Denmark, N.Y., saw an opportunity during the construction downturn to offer a unique product. So it purchased three pieces of equipment in online auctions in 2009 and 2010. After learning how each one works, separately and in tandem, the family-owned mill now offers pre-stained and pre-treated floorboards and siding.

"We realize the demand for colors and the demand for having it prefinished," sales manager George LaBarr told the Journal & Republic. "It’s so hard to do it in the field and do it right."

The prefinished wood with the clear coat is typically used indoors, while the stained-only wood is for exterior use. Retailers can match paints or stains for homeowners and custom-order the prefinished boards in six or eight-inch widths. The company has ramped up production in the last few months and distributes to about 200 independent lumberyards. The mill is located at the foothills of the Adirondacks in Northern New York.

"We’re not reinventing ourselves, but we’re strategically adding products," LaBarr said.

 

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Conflict resolution: Let employees find the solutions

BY Nancy M Davis

Don’t let disputes escalate to the point they require formal mediation, advised Steven P. Dinkin, president of the National Conflict Resolution Center in San Diego, at the 2012 Society for Human Resource Management Annual Conference here.

He and Ashley Virtue, the center’s director of external relations, taught a two-day workshop on “The Exchange,” an informal four-stage method that line managers and HR professionals can use to help employees find their own solutions to workplace conflict.

Unlike formal mediation — in which parties seek resolution through an impartial mediator — the Exchange requires three-way interaction between two employees and a line manager or HR professional with a vested interest in maintaining company standards and policies — not an impartial position, said Dinkin. He and other center mediators developed the method and teach it to clients including government agencies, universities, health facilities and corporations.

Stage 1: The manager meets with each party privately to gather information. What issues are disputed? What is each employee’s perspective?

Stage 2: The manager prepares a written agenda for a joint meeting. First, list the disputes. Are work styles, communication or interruptions on the table? Second, what is the emotional impact on employees? Consider respect, frustration or emotional blocks. Third, identify a neutral question you can pose to break the ice at the joint meeting.

Ask each to give their perspectives. For example, ask them what personal goals brought them to the organization in the first place. The manager might want to review the agenda with an HR professional before proceeding, and keep confidentiality in mind, Dinkin suggested.

Stage 3: Conduct the joint meeting. Go through the agenda. Frame issues in a neutral way.

“You want to get both employees to understand the other employee’s perspective. They may not have talked to each other for a long time — they’ve made some assumptions. This is the time to start to overcome those assumptions,” Dinkin said. “Try to get employees to talk to each other so they can understand the impact of the conflict on the other,” he advised.

After each employee speaks, the manager asks the other employee to repeat what he or she has heard that person say. Then, as manager, “This is your time to say that these are the expectations I have going forward. This dispute is having an impact on our customers,” he advised. “This is a three-way conversation.”

Listen respectfully and use follow-up questions to pull out information, Dinkin instructed.

Some conflict becomes personal: “That+s when people start to avoid each other.” So the manager should open doors for future conversations. Employees must learn to communicate with each other, he said.

And employees take ownership of solutions. “Then, if you come back three months later, that solution is going to stick,” he explained.

Stage 4: Facilitate problem solving. “It doesn’t have to be a compromise — both sides can walk away feeling like they’ve succeeded,” he said. Create an action plan. Features of “SMART” plans: They are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timed.

At the end of the joint meeting, discuss what information will be disclosed to others. Finally, the manager should periodically check with employees and see whether agreements are being followed, he said.

Last year, Dinkin’s colleagues held an Exchange to resolve who should answer the phone when the receptionist was not available. Nine months later, the employees involved expressed heart-felt thanks to the manager who intervened.

Underlying the negotiations: Respect for the issue, respect for the people and a respect for the process, he said. “When people are involved in the process—they have a stake in the outcome.”

Nancy M. Davis is editor of HR Magazine.

Have HR-related questions and concerns? Get access to essential forms, policies and guides, plus a live call center, at ToolkitHR.com, powered by HCN and the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).  

 

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WD-40 Co. sales increase 2% in Q3

BY Brae Canlen

San Diego-based WD-40, whose brands include a variety of lubricants and cleaning products, reported net sales of $87.0 million for the third quarter of fiscal 2012, an increase of 2% from the same quarter of its last fiscal year. Year-to-date net sales were $257.9 million, up 5% from the same period last fiscal year.

Net income for the third quarter was $9.1 million, an increase of 13% compared with the prior-year fiscal quarter. Year-to-date net income was $26.5 million, an increase of 1% from a year ago.

Third-quarter multi-purpose maintenance products sales, which include the WD-40 multi-use product, 3-in-1 Blue Works and the WD-40 specialist product lines, were $73.7 million, up 1% from the same period last year, and $215.9 million year-to-date, up 6% from the same period last fiscal year. The multi-purpose maintenance products are considered a primary focus for the company.

Homecare and cleaning products sales, which include all other brands, were $13.3 million for the third quarter, up 4%, and were $42.0 million year-to-date, up 3%, compared with the prior fiscal year periods. The U.S. homecare and cleaning products are considered harvest brands providing healthy profit returns to the company and are becoming a smaller part of the business as the multi-purpose maintenance products sales grow.

“We are pleased with our overall results so far this year, and our tribe continues to focus their energy on our key strategic initiatives," said Garry Ridge, WD-40 president and CEO. "However, we are cautious about the continuing volatility of commodity prices and the uncertain economic conditions in Europe and their impact on our overall sales. We expect Europe to come in flat at best for the full year as compared with the prior fiscal year."

Net sales by segment as a percent of total net sales were as follows: for the Americas, 50% for the third quarter and 51% year-to-date; for Europe, 35% for the third quarter and 34% year-to-date; and for Asia-Pacific, 15% for both the third quarter and year-to-date.

WD-40 continues to expect fiscal year 2012 net sales of $353.0 million to $370.0 million. The company expects net income of $37.2 million to $39.2 million.     

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