News

Irwin brings ‘toughness’ message to new level

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Irwin Tools, the division of Newell Rubbermaid, has developed the new 2500 Series of levels featuring a new frame design that the company says stands up to twisting, dropping and general jobsite abuse.

Irwin guarantee’s vial accuracy for the life of the product.

"Finally, there is a level as tough as the professional tradesman," said Curt Rahilly, VP of marketing for Newell Rubbermaid’s Construction Tools & Accessories global business unit. "We’ve engineered Irwin levels to meet a new standard of excellence with features that improve productivity and performance on the jobsite and provide the durability needed to maintain accuracy over time.”

Irwin levels address previously unmet user needs including vial readability with Plumb Site technology for dual-sided, undistorted viewing, making plumb readings easier and more accurate in the tight spots common to many work environments.  Irwin levels also enable tradesmen to level and scribe flush into corners with a variety of proprietary features including removable and retractable end cap designs and feature a continuous edge over the center vial for added durability.

Irwin is supporting the 2500 Series levels launch with a marketing campaign designed to drive professional users to local retailers.  A national radio campaign will run on sports radio stations during basketball and football season and will tag local retailers regionally.  In-store "trade-in and trade-up" programs will encourage tradesmen to trade in their existing level for up to $20 off a new Irwin level.

The powerful new lineup of Irwin levels includes box beam, I-beam, torpedo and multiple specialty levels, as well as a full range of utility levels and squares. Irwin levels are now available at hardware stores and industrial tool distributors throughout the U.S. and Canada with suggested retail prices ranging from $29.99 to $309.99.  The new program will be introduced in Latin America and Europe in 2013.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How much credit should be given to the co-op business model for the success of the independent hardware and building supply dealer over the last half century?
News

After 20 years, it’s easier to be green

BY HBSDealer Staff

In 1992, Energy Star was launched as the first national, market-driven energy efficiency partnership program of its kind. If EPA’s estimates are to be believed, the effort has worked wonders. According to the EPA, Energy Star has helped save Americans $23 billion on their energy bills while preventing greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to the annual emissions of 41 million vehicles.

Today, more than 1.3 million new homes and nearly 16,500 buildings have earned EPA’s Energy Star certification. Moreover, the Energy Star label can be found on more than 60 different kinds of products with more than 5 billion sold over the past 20 years.

According to Ann Bailey, director of Energy Star Product Labeling for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), one of the strengths of the Energy Star brand is that “regardless of which message resonates with consumers, Energy Star homes are both cost- and energy-effective.”

She said that consumers may pay a little more upfront for a more energy-efficient product, but they will recover their investment through energy cost-savings over time.

Bailey said the green movement has helped raised awareness among consumers and businesses about the value of sustainable products and practices. “This has allowed the Energy Star program to push markets to adopt more energy-efficient practices and products,” she said. “Energy Star has become a leading source of information for consumers looking for energy-efficient products, homes and buildings. All products, homes and buildings that bear the mark have been certified by a third party as meeting the program’s strict requirements.”

Energy Star counts more than 1,700 retail “partners” who have helped spread the word about energy-efficient products so consumers can make informed decisions about cost-effective ways to save energy.

Products can earn the Energy Star label by meeting the energy efficiency requirements set forth in Energy Star product specifications, which are based on the following principles:

• Product categories must contribute significant energy savings nationwide.
• Qualified products must deliver the features and performance demanded by consumers, in addition to increased energy efficiency.
• If the qualified product costs more than a conventional, less-efficient counterpart, purchasers will recover their investment in increased energy efficiency through utility bill savings, within a reasonable period of time.
• Energy efficiency can be achieved through broadly available, non-proprietary technologies offered by more than one manufacturer.
• Product energy consumption and performance can be measured and verified with testing.
• Labeling would effectively differentiate products and be visible for purchasers.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

No comments found

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How much credit should be given to the co-op business model for the success of the independent hardware and building supply dealer over the last half century?
News

Mixed signals from Consumer Confidence data

BY Ken Clark

The Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index, which had increased in February, pulled back slightly in March. The Index now stands at 70.2 (1985=100), down from 71.6 in February. The Present Situation Index, however, increased to 51.0 from 46.4. The Expectations Index declined to 83.0 from 88.4 in February.

“The moderate decline was due solely to a less favorable short-term outlook, while consumers’ assessment of current conditions, on the other hand, continued to improve,” said Lynn Franco, director of The Conference Board Consumer Research Center. “The Present Situation Index now stands at its highest level in three and a half years (61.1, September 2008), suggesting that despite this month’s dip in confidence, consumers feel the economy is not losing momentum."

Consumers’ appraisal of current conditions improved in March. Those claiming business conditions are "good" increased to 14.3% from 13.7%.  However, those claiming business conditions are “bad” also increased, to 32.7% from 31.7%. Consumers’ assessment of the job market was mixed. Those saying jobs are "plentiful" increased to 9.4% from 7.0%, while those stating jobs are "hard to get" also rose, to 41.0% from 38.6%.

The monthly Consumer Confidence Survey, based on a probability-design random sample, is conducted for The Conference Board by Nielsen, a leading global provider of information and analytics around what consumers buy and watch. The cutoff date for the preliminary results was March 15.

keyboard_arrow_downCOMMENTS

Leave a Reply

s.charlote says:
May-04-2012 09:42 am

I can not say that I am not
I can not say that I am not amazed to hear all this but also very happy. I have bookmarked and going to make more research in this subject. Book a winter vacation package with your partner - ski resorts in tatra

D.Norton says:
Mar-28-2012 04:26 pm

Mixed signals? Are you
Mixed signals? Are you kidding me? If you have 32.7% of respondents saying business conditions are bad vs 14.3% saying they are good & 41% saying jobs are hard to get vs 9.4% saying they are plentiful, how are those mixed signals? Hey, Lynn Franco, "the economy is not losing momentum." What momentum? What's the agenda here?

TRENDING STORIES

POLLS

How much credit should be given to the co-op business model for the success of the independent hardware and building supply dealer over the last half century?