HARDWARE STORES

House-Hasson sees rise in store construction projects

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Knoxville, Tenn.-based House-Hasson Hardware set a company record in 2013 for new and remodeled hardware store and lumberyard projects, the company announced.

House-Hasson’s 30 new-store and remodeling projects, called store sets, topped the previous high mark of 25 set in the previous year. 

“These numbers are growing because dealers are seeing new or renovated stores as a great investment, and they’re taking advantage of deals the depressed real estate market has enabled them to make on building and locations,” President Don Hasson said. 

“We saw this unfolding last year and thought it might be a trend originating within the economic downturn,” he added. “Entrepreneurs are entrepreneurs for a reason: they’re always looking for ways to advance. The growth in our dealer technology support is probably a lead horse pulling their wagon.

House-Hasson heads into 2014 with more such projects pending than at the start of any year in the company’s 107-year history. It opened 2014 with a record 44 projects on its planning boards.

The company has a corporate team set up to work with dealers on their new or renovated store planning; design; layout; merchandising; dealer and customer support; electronic functions; and every other component of opening the new business. 

Dave Helfenberger, House-Hasson vice president of marketing, said dealers are combining real estate bargains with a series of features House-Hasson has added to improve dealer profitability.

“These store sets are very serious, detail-oriented and large projects for dealers,” Helfenberger said. “It’s mainly about more square feet, more product facings, and producing more sales per square foot.”

House-Hasson Hardware serves some 2,000 independent hardware stores and lumberyards in 17 states and the Caribbean.

 

 

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At Rocky’s, pets get tons of donations

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Springfield, Mass.-based Rocky’s Ace Hardware collected more than 4 tons of pet food, along with beds, leashes, treats, toys and cleaning supplies and delivered them to local animal shelters. The final weight of pet food amassed totaled an amazing 8,776 pounds.

Rocky’s is a family-owned business with 32 stores in the Northeast and Florida. Each of the 32 stores partnered with an area Humane Society or Shelter to collect food during the holiday season for the much-forgotten and unfortunate animals in our own community. “The outpouring from our customers was, just in previous years, truly heartwarming. Every year I am taken back by the level of support this drives receives. All of us at Rocky’s extend sincere thanks to our neighbors who gave so generously,” said Rocco Falcone, president and CEO.

“This annual drive gets bigger and better every year. This year’s total was absolutely staggering,” said Geoffrey Webb, director of marketing and advertising. “Last year we were able to donate 6,556 pounds of food plus accessories. This year the extraordinary efforts of our store team members in rallying behind this worthy cause along with the outstanding generosity of our customers resulted in an unprecedented total amount of donations.”

The program supported 30 organizations that provide shelter, veterinary care and comfort for homeless animals in five states. “Besides the enormous increase in food donations, we were also able to pass along much-needed cleaning supplies, feeders, pet crates, leashes and other items as designated by the shelters on their wish lists,” added Webb.

Here is how the program worked: Customers and Rocky’s employees alike made donations of pet food and supplies at their local Rocky’s Ace Hardware store. The store teams also worked closely with their neighborhood shelters to find and collect non-food items the organization needed. The stores collected all donations and drove them to their locally chosen charity. Nutro Pet Foods helped kick-start the program with a donation of $1,500 worth of premium dog and cat food. The drive started in November, and goods were delivered around Christmas.

“The campaign has become an annual tradition here at Rocky’s,” Falcone said. “Our team members often make donations of their own and many volunteer at a neighborhood shelter. All encourage our customers to support the drive. We are honored to be a catalyst in achieving these outstanding results for the homeless and abandoned animals in our communities."

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Seven Corners sold to developer

BY HBSDEALER Staff

St. Paul, Minn.-based Seven Corners Hardware, which has served hobbyists, homeowners, contractors and other DIY-oriented customers in the Twin Cities and beyond since 1933, will be closing its doors as a result of a real estate deal, said third-generation owner Bill Walsh, whose father and grandfather previously ran the store.

The company retained Tiger Capital Group to direct the sale of its merchandise inventories and other assets. 

“Over the years, our family has turned down several offers to buy our property, which is prime real estate right across from Xcel Energy Arena,” Walsh noted. “We have always resisted these types of offers. But late last year, we made the difficult decision to sell to one of the nation’s largest real estate developers. The hardest part of this was contemplating the effect it would have on our 21 full-time employees.” 

The decision hinged on a host of personal and business considerations, explained Walsh, who has operated Seven Corners for the past 28 years but has lived in California with his family for the past decade. “I have growing business interests in California and Nevada that have been requiring more and more of my time, and so traveling back and forth between the Midwest and the West Coast has become increasingly difficult,” he said. “Meanwhile, my son is a freshman at Notre Dame, and his career path is unlikely to include becoming the fourth generation to run the store.” 

Given the tough competition in retailing today as well as Seven Corners’ location in a downtown neighborhood with rising real estate values, the pressure to close the business would only have grown moving forward, Walsh added. “Simply put, it seemed like the right time for this decision,” he said. 

With 10,000 sq. ft. of retail space and 60,000 sq. ft. of warehouse storage, Seven Corners is known for the depth of its product lines as well as its 640-page catalog, which it distributes for free to contractors, woodworkers and hobbyists across the country. In 2012, the store’s distinctiveness prompted a profile in Popular Mechanics, which marveled at the dizzying selection of products, replete with unusual items like a 4-ft.-long pipe wrench or Manila rope so thick it has to be cut with a hacksaw before it can be sold to Mississippi River barge operators. 

With its 1,500-or-so contractor accounts, Seven Corners sells 200 types of hammers, 400 screwdrivers, 170 different files and 4,200 plumbing products. “Our second-floor showroom has 900 power tools on display, with models of drills, saws, planers, routers, pneumatics, stationary machinery and other tools that some of our customers never knew existed,” Walsh said. 

When Walsh’s grandfather, William L. Walsh, opened Seven Corners in 1933, the store sold much more than hardware. “People came in to buy hunting supplies, pots and pans — you name it,” Walsh said. “Back then, with our wood floors, 12-ft. ceilings and mix of general goods, we were more like an old-fashioned department store than a modern hardware operation.” But in the 1960s, Walsh’s father, Robert L. Walsh, responded to America’s postwar construction boom by broadening Seven Corners’ focus. “He wanted to meet the needs of busy contractors throughout the Twin Cities,” explained Walsh, who was 10 when he started helping his father at the store. “It was a great move, because later on it helped differentiate us from giants like Walmart and The Home Depot.”

When Walsh took over the business from his father in the late 1980s, he focused on ramping up the mail-order business. Catalog sales surged, and in 1991 Walsh expanded Seven Corners by adding a second floor. “Since about 1990, we have shipped more than 1.7 million packages all around the world through our mail-order business,” Walsh noted. 

As Seven Corners grew, it retained some of the personalized, small-town feel that had characterized its early years, Walsh said. “You could walk in and say, ‘Geez, my faucet broke and my wife really wants me to fix it. Can you help me through it?’ And my guys would be happy to spend 20 minutes helping you through that, even if all you needed was a washer,” he said. “Conversely, a local university might call up with a $10,000 purchase of specialized tools and equipment for a big project. At our store, we have always been happy to serve both types of customers.”

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