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FrogTape’s painting pro offers tips

BY Ken Clark

FrogTape, a division of Avon, Ohio-based ShurTech Brands, is promoting its painter’s tape with the help of a professional painter — Dan Brady of Traverse City, Mich.-based Dan Brady Painting & Wood Restoration.

"When you’re painting a deep color into white trim, I don’t care how steady your hand is, it helps to have a tape that doesn’t bleed," said Brady.

Common mistakes of DIYers engaged in painting projects, he said, include:

• Failing to perform sufficient prep work;

• Taping too close to the corner of a wall — painters should leave a 1/16-in. gap, instead of trying to apply it flush against the other wall;

• Clean surface throroughly, especially if there is a waxy buildup, when applying painter’s tape; 

• Remove painter’s tape when the paint is still wet, not after it has dried.

The product Brady promotes — FrogTape — is made with a liquid-blocking polymer called PaintBlock Technology designed to prevent bleeding.

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EPA gets tough with rat poison manufacturers

BY HBSDEALER Staff

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that it is moving to ban the sale of “the most toxic” consumer rat and mouse poisons, as well as most loose bait and pellet products. The agency is also requiring that all newly registered rat and mouse poisons marketed to residential consumers be enclosed in bait stations so children and pets cannot access the pesticide. The new regulations will also protect wildlife that consume bait or poisoned rodents, the EPA said in its announcement.    

Children are particularly at risk, the EPA noted, because the rat and mouse poisons are typically placed on floors, where young children sometimes place bait pellets in their mouths. The American Association of Poison Control Centers annually receives 12,000 to 15,000 reports of children under the age of six being exposed to these types of products.

In 2008, the EPA gave producers of rat and mouse poison until June 4, 2011, to research, develop and register new products that would be safer for children, pets and wildlife. Over the past three years, EPA has worked with a number of companies to achieve that goal, and there are now new products on the market with new bait delivery systems and less toxic baits that still provide effective rodent control, according to the EPA.

However, a handful of companies have advised the EPA that they do not plan to adopt the new safety measures, the EPA said. Consequently, the EPA intends to initiate cancellation proceedings under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, the federal pesticide law, against certain non-compliant products marketed by the following companies to remove them from the market:

• Woodstream Inc. (makers of Victor rodent control products)
• Spectrum Group (makers of Hot Shot rodent control products)
• Liphatech Inc. (makers of Generation, Maki, and Rozol rodent control products)
• Reckitt Benckiser Inc. (makers of D-Con, Fleeject, and Mimas rodent control products)

In addition to requiring more protective bait stations and prohibiting pellet formulations, the EPA intends to ban the sale and distribution of rodenticide products containing brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difethialone and difenacoum directly to residential consumers because of their toxicity and the secondary poisoning hazards to wildlife. These rodenticides will still be available for use by professional pest control applicators and in agricultural settings. 

For more information on rat and mouse products that meet EPA’s safety standard, click here.

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r.sanders says:
Jan-10-2012 05:05 pm

This ban makes full sense to
This ban makes full sense to me although I personally think that's it's not the poison to blame but the irresponsible parents that put deadly poison on the floor forgetting that their children may get exposed. I am all in favor of advanced pest control methods as long as my kids stay safe.

kclark says:
Jun-14-2011 04:55 pm

Alan Pryor of Liphatech
Alan Pryor of Liphatech responds: Reckitt Benckiser will continue to market their d-DON pellets (Brodifacoum) and mini-blocks (Difethialone) until EPA files a Notice to cancel the d-CON registrations. By the way, before EPA can issues a Cancellation Notice, EPA must notify USDA, HHS and a FIFRA Science Advisory Panel ---- this notification process is completely transparent and will take about four months to complete. Once the Cancelation Notices are filed with the registrants, the proceedings will move to an Administrative Law Judge and could take up to 2 years before a decision is rendered. If, for example, Reckitt Benckiser is not satisfied with the result, a Federal lawsuit against EPA would likely be filed. Bottom line, the battle lines have been drawn and the legal battle with move forward. But, for the moment, retailers may continue to sell the existing d-CON products because these products are legally registered. The EPA cannot simply wish the products out of the retail marketplace.

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Readers Respond: Safety in the store

BY HBSDEALER Staff

An article about dangerous home improvement activities generated this letter about unattended children inside stores.

"One of the biggest issues I find with customer safety are customers who do not mind their children. Kids think hardware and home improvement stores are playgrounds, and parents think the store is the babysitter. As a responsible retailer, it is your job to educate the parents on the dangers of not supervising their own children. Your staff cannot be the babysitter, the nanny or the entertainer. Your employees have difficult jobs, selling to customers and the never-ending task lists that must be completed to maintain your business, which is hard enough without having to keep saying, ‘Johnny, don’t climb up on that’ or ‘Suzie don’t crawl in there’ every five minutes. My approach is simple and direct. I tell the parents that I am not the babysitter and that it is their responsibility to mind their kids.

I even had customers leave their children in my store and go to another store, expecting my staff to watch them. This is an accident waiting to happen."
— Rocco Arena

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