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Former Home Depot exec moves on to sporting goods

BY Ken Clark

Sporting goods retailer Hibbett Sports hired Scott J. Bowman as CFO and senior VP. Bowman was CFO for the northern division of The Home Depot since 2006. 

Bowman also served in the role of senior director, finance and IT with the world’s largest home improvement retailer. He was with Home Depot since 2006. Prior to that, Bowman worked for The Sherwin-Williams Co.

At Birmingham, Ala.-based Hibbett, Bowman will replace Gary Smith, who is retiring. The move is effective July 9.

In late May, Hibbett added Tractor Supply Co.’s CFO Anthony Crudele to its board of directors.

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Readers respond: Good riddance to the penny?

BY HBSDEALER Staff

A hardware store in Coconut Grove, Fla., decided to join the movement to do away with pennies in cash transactions. Several readers weighed in on whether the concept of the penny makes any sense.

“I am now approaching 60 years old. When I was much younger, in my 20s, a penny was worth the equivalent of 5 or more cents today. Right now the copper in a penny is worth more than the value of the denomination. It is time to make the decision to eliminate this coin, because it does not serve a real function anymore, and actually costs more than it is worth.”
— George McCullough 

“Canada has ceased production of the penny. Great idea as it has essentially no value, is a pain to deal with and nobody wants them! The nickel will also be phased out in the near future. Transactions will be simply rounded up or down to the nearest nickel (and the nearest dime in the future). No one loses as it all averages out in the end. Credit card or debit transactions will still be to the penny.

"The one and two dollar coins have been well accepted. The only glitch is the mint changed the weight of the one-dollar coin without telling coin machine operators and now they don’t work. The operators will adapt but the communication could have been better.”
— Chuck Crocker
Winnipeg Sales Associates
Huron Window Corp.

“[Banning the penny is] not a good idea. The larger the increment, the larger the cost.  At retail, sales tax payments, income tax payments all would round up so the end consumer pays the price.

“It’s like the 3.99.9 cost on gasoline. Leave the 10th of a cent there; or in the transaction sense, leave the pennies there.”
— Charles "Chaz" Mott  

“Although the surveys show it would hurt the lowest-income people, it is time to get rid of the penny. When it costs more to produce the penny than what it is worth then make it go away. Rounding the transaction to the nearest nickel is the right thing to do.”
— David Wood 

“Like the horse drawn-carriages, Dodo birds and lots of bygone ‘other things,’ the penny has outlived its usefulness and reason for being. It’s about time to eliminate it!”
— Paul Siegel
GoPro Construction

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Sustainability standards move ahead in home appliances

BY Ken Clark

The sustainability standards for refrigerators, announced recently by the Association for Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM), are the result of cooperative work by UL Environment, CSA Group and the AHAM taskforce consisting of industry experts.

The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM), CSA Group, and UL Environment announced the release of AHAM 7001-2012/CSA SPE- 7001-12/UL 7001, Sustainability Standard for Household Refrigeration Appliances, the first voluntary sustainability standard for home appliances. This new standard is the first in a family of product sustainability standards under development by AHAM, CSA Group and UL Environment intended for use by manufacturers, governments, retailers and others to identify environmentally preferable products. The standard is based on a lifecycle approach for identifying the environmental impacts of refrigeration products in five key areas: energy, materials, end-of-life, performance, and manufacturing.

This standard will serve as an objective and practical measurement tool to assist refrigeration manufacturers in evaluating the environmental sustainability of home appliances. The three organizations next will form consensus committees to move the standard through the United States and Canadian accredited standards process, following the requirements of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), respectively.

“The AHAM-CSA-UL collaboration represents vast experience in appliance design, manufacture and use, standards development and product lifecycle analysis. Coupled with the critical stakeholder input, we believe this standard and others that will follow represent a strong commitment to sustainability and provide workable tools for appliance purchasers to compare the environmental attributes of appliances,” explained Joseph McGuire, president of the AHAM.

“CSA Group is committed to developing standards for evaluating and communicating environmental information for products and services that help advance environmental performance and consumer knowledge,” said Bonnie Rose, president, Standards, CSA Group. “Working together on the taskforce for sustainability of household refrigeration appliances, we have jointly developed the first of many new product standards that look at the environmental impact of products across their full life cycle.”

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