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Foremost introduces premium SOMA vanities

BY HBSDEALER Staff

East Hanover, N.J.-based Foremost Groups is introducing a new line of premium bath vanity collections. Called SOMA, the collection features a number of high-end attributes and will be sold through “local kitchen and bath showrooms across the United States and Canada,” according to the company.

The SOMA products feature solid wood construction and solid wood drawer boxes with dovetail construction. Concealed under-mount glides and slow-close glides and hinges are also standard features.

Foremost Groups was established in 1987 as a privately held company focused on importing wood cabinetry and bathroom fixtures for the retail market.

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O.Max says:
May-12-2012 06:35 am

Absolutely correct. With
Absolutely correct. With looks and utility consider the space it's going to consume.If you want to create additional space in your bathroom area then the best option is to plant cabinets with small bathroom ideas. With respect to the kind of stuff that you are looking out for you will see that there is a wide array of such styles and designs present.

A.Burma says:
Feb-06-2012 11:38 am

The vanities are looking
The vanities are looking appealing. But while designing your bathroom you should not just install any product you like; you have to make sure that these products have utility and the looks. When I bought bathroom vanity sets, I kept this in mind. Try to buy branded products; they assure quality.

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Lowe’s raises offer to drywall victims

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Lowe’s has substantially raised its offer to customers who claim they bought defective drywall at its stores in Georgia after coming under criticism for its previous offer, according to a report by the Sarasota Herald-Tribune and Pro Publica.

In Lowe’s latest offer, filed on Oct. 28, affected homeowners are now eligible for up to $100,000 in cash, instead of gifts cards in the amounts of $50, $250 or $2,000, with a maximum payout of $4,500 in combined cash and gift cards. The previous settlement had been offered as part of a class action lawsuit that is being negotiated in a Georgia state court.

The earlier settlement set aside $6.5 million for victims and $2.1 million for the attorneys who negotiated the agreement. This resulted in an outcry from public interest attorneys and consumer advocates, who also criticized the payout as being too low. The cost of removing and replacing tainted drywall and corroded electrical wiring can cost $100,000, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

The newly amended settlement was negotiated by a separate team of attorneys on behalf of a Florida corrections officer. Lowe’s has set aside an additional $2.25 million for the homeowners in this case. The original attorneys will still get $2.1 million in fees. The new attorneys will receive a separate fee based on how many $100,000 claims Lowe’s eventually pays.

The North Carolina retailer has stated that it does not believe the drywall it sold was defective because Lowe’s vendors assured the company that they never sold it any Chinese drywall. Lowe’s entered into the original agreement “as part of our commitment to serving our customers,” according to a company statement.

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Sentence for former Depot buyer

BY HBSDEALER Staff

A former Home Depot product category merchant was sentenced to more than two years in prison for participating in what has been described as a $1.5 million fraud scheme in the retailer’s flooring department.

According to an article in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Ronald Douglass Matheny II, 43, of Chattanooga, Tenn., was sentenced to two years and three months after he pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and wire fraud, and additional charges.

The trials of those involved in the kickback scheme that occurred from 2002 to 2007 have been slowly working their way through the court system.

In April, two of the three figures involved were sentenced. James Robinson, a former divisional merchandise manager for hard flooring at Home Depot received a sentence of 63 months in prison. Ronald Johnston, the company’s global product merchant for rugs, was sentenced to 46 months in prison. Both men were also ordered to pay $1.8 million.

In June, former buyer Anthony Tesvich was sentenced to six and a half years.

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