LUMBERYARDS

Existing-home sales decline in July

BY Allison Har-Zvi

The National Association of Realtors (NAR) reported that existing-home sales declined in July compared with June, but have improved compared with a year ago.

Total existing-home sales, which are based on transaction closings of single-family, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, fell from a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.84 million in June to 4.67 million in July, a decrease of 3.5%. However, existing-home sales for July 2011 were 21.0% above the 3.86 million-unit pace in July 2010.

Single-family home sales were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.12 million in July, down 4% from 4.29 million in June, but 21.5% above the 3.39 million level set a year ago. The median existing single-family home price was $174,800 in July, down 4.5% in July 2010.

Existing condominium and co-op sales were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 550,000 in July 2011, unchanged from June and 17.3% above the 469,000-unit mark in July 2010. The median existing condo price was $168,400, down 4% from a year ago.

The NAR reported monthly declines in the West and South, which offset gains in the Midwest and Northeast for an overall monthly decline in existing-home sales.

Existing-home sales in the Northeast rose in July 2011 to an annual level of 750,000 from 469,000 in July 2010, an increase of 17.3%. The median existing condo price in the Northeast was $168,400, down 4% from July 2010. In the Midwest, existing-home sales increased 1.0% from June to July, and are at a pace of 1.05 million, a 31.3% increase from July 2010. The Midwest median price was $146,300, down 2.9% from a year ago. In the West, existing-home sales fell to an annual pace of 1.04 million in July 2011, a 12.6% decrease since June but a 16.9% improvement compared with July 2010. The median price in the West was down 7.1% from July 2010, at $208,300. The South showed a 1.6% decline in existing-home sales since June, falling to an annual level of 1.84 million, which nevertheless is 19.5% above July 2010. The median price in the South was 2.2% below a year ago, at $152,600.

The national median existing-home price for all housing types was down 4.4% from July 2010, at $174,000 in July 2011. Distressed homes — foreclosures and short sales typically sold at deep discounts — accounted for 29% of sales in July, compared with 30% in June and 32% in July 2010.

Total housing inventory at the end of July fell 1.7% to 3.65 million existing homes available for sale, which represents a 9.4-month supply at the current sales pace, up from a 9.2-month supply in June.

All-cash sales accounted for 29% of transactions in July, compared with 30% in June 2010, with no change compared with June 2011. The majority of cash purchases can be attributed to investors, the NAR reported.

First-time buyers purchased 32% of homes in July, compared with 31% in June, and 38% in July 2010. Investors accounted for 18% of purchase activity in July, 19% in June, and 19% in July 2010. The balance of sales was to repeat buyers, which, unchanged from June, were a 50% market share in July.

Freddie Mac reported that the national average commitment rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage was 4.55% in July, compared with 4.51% in June and 4.56% a year ago. Last week, Freddie Mac said the 30-year fixed rate dropped to 4.32%, according to the NAR.

In July, an unchanged 16% of NAR members reported contract failures, cancellations caused largely by declined mortgage applications or failures in loan underwriting from appraised values coming in below the negotiated price. An additional 9% reported a delayed contract in the last three months because of low appraisals, and another 13% reported contracts that were renegotiated to lower prices because an appraisal was below the initially agreed price.

“For both mortgage credit and home appraisals, there’s been a parallel pendulum swing from very loose standards, which led to the housing boom, to unnecessarily restrictive practices as an overreaction to the housing correction,” said Ron Phipps, president of the NAR.

“Beyond the tight credit problems, all appraisals must be done by valuators with local expertise and using reasonable comparisons. It doesn’t make sense to consistently see so many valuations coming in below negotiated prices, often below replacement construction costs,” Phipps said.

According to Phipps, in an environment following a large price correction, the price negotiated between a buyer and seller should be a fair market price. However, he said, the number of home buyers unable to complete transactions is unacceptably high. “Banks frequently request numerous sales comparisons, well beyond the customary three comps used in the past, with little consideration that some of those properties may be discounted foreclosures used to valuate a traditional home in good condition,” he said. “To a great extent, banks are exerting influence on appraised valuations with negative impacts for both home sales and prices.”

“Affordability conditions this year have been the most favorable on record dating back to 1970, but many buyers are being held back because banks are offering financing to only the most highly qualified borrowers, ignoring a large share of otherwise creditworthy buyers,” said Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the NAR. “Those potential buyers represent the difference between an uneven recovery and a much more robust housing market that could stimulate additional economic activity and create jobs.”

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84 Lumber builds house for fire victims

BY Brae Canlen

A couple from Callery, Pa., who narrowly escaped a fire that destroyed their home will soon move into a new 1,300-sq.-ft. house being built for them by 84 Lumber.

Judy and Ed Conway fled their doublewide mobile home on July 27, and news coverage of the couple’s plight reached Maggie Hardy Magerko, president of 84 Lumber. The national LBM chain, headquartered in Eighty Four, Pa., put the wheels in motion to replace the damaged structure with a three-bedroom, two-bath house with a carport¸ deck and storage shed. The home, located in a rural area outside of Pittsburgh, also contains other ADA-compliant features. 

“Maggie saw a TV news report of the fire and how the couple barely escaped,” said Jeff Nobers, VP marketing and public relations for 84 Lumber. “Mrs. Conway has had multiple health issues over the years and had just returned home from medical care. It struck Maggie deeply, what these folks have already been through and now faced the loss of their home.  She felt compelled to help this couple live out their years in comfort and in a house that Mrs. Conway could easily navigate.”

Demolition and excavating services are being donated, Nobers said, and the foundation block and concrete are being purchased at cost. One of 84 Lumber’s customers, a modular builder, is in charge of construction. Materials (including interior fixtures and finishing) will cost 84 Lumber about $90,000, Nobers estimated, and appraise at $150,000. 

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Pro dealer trumps bank in Michigan lien case

BY Brae Canlen

The U.S. Michigan Court of Appeals has upheld the construction lien of Stock Building Supply over AmTrust Bank in a residential foreclosure case, according to an opinion released on Aug. 2. 

Stock, along with co-plaintiff Jeddo Drywall, supplied materials for a single-family house being built in 2006 in a development called Cambridge Meadows, a community south of Detroit. Cambridge did not pay Jeddo and Stock, so both companies filed liens against the developer. Stock’s final lien eventually totaled $35,997. AmTrust Bank, which provided construction funding for Cambridge in 2005 when it was installing streets and utilities, foreclosed on the subdivision in 2008.

Jeddo and Stock were forced to sue AmTrust and others to foreclose on their construction liens. A trial court ruled in their favor because construction liens have priority as a matter of law, as long as physical improvements were made to the property before AmTrust recorded its mortgage. 

The Michigan appeals court agreed. Construction liens for labor and materials furnished for a particular residence in a subdivision have priority over a bank’s mortgage covering the entire subdivision, the judges said. They also disagreed with the bank’s argument that no physical improvements had been made to the property before the mortgage was recorded. Grading, paving streets and installing utilities all counted as property improvements, the court ruled.

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