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Demand to rise for outdoor power equipment

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Consumer demand for lawnmowers, trimmers, edgers, rotary tillers and other outdoors power equipment will grow over the next several years as spending rebounds from the 2007 to 2009 recession, according to the Freedonia Group. 

U.S. demand for power lawn and garden equipment will increase 5.7% yearly to $10.4 billion in 2015, the Cleveland-based market research group said. Improvement in U.S. housing activity, including both new construction and the sale of existing homes, will also benefit sales. 

Sales to commercial sectors will grow more slowly than to residential markets through 2015, although higher value commercial equipment will boost demand. Over the longer term, equipment demand in the golf course segment will be inhibited by the declining number of courses, the Freedonia report said.

Although demand will pick up across all categories, the fastest growers will be turf and grounds equipment, garden tractors, and rotary tillers. Lawnmowers come next, with a projected annual growth rate of 6.5% through 2015. 

The full report, “Power Lawn & Garden Equipment,” is available at freedoniagroup.com. 

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Industry Dashboard for May 2, 2011

BY HBSDEALER Staff

The Home Channel Stock Roundup shows a wide range of share-price fluctuation, and the gas price chart shows a steady rise.

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In N.C. the lesson is clear: Safety first

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Congratulatory phone calls from the president of the United States are usually reserved for the likes of World Series pitchers or Nobel Prize winners. But Lowe’s store manager Michael Hollowell received his call the day after he and his team herded about 70 customers away from the vulnerable front-end of his Sanford, N.C., store, moments before it was ripped apart by a tornado.


The modest Hollowell credited the training and policies handed down to him and his team from the Mooresville, N.C.-based retailer. But interviews with witnesses suggest that quick thinking and decisive action played a major role, as customers verbally questioned the danger — and even the existence of a tornado. According to reports, it took calm, clear leadership to get everyone back to the protected rear of the store, literally seconds before the tornado hit.


Home Channel News asked Lowe’s to describe the policies that Michael Hollowell credited for the successful emergency management. Here’s what we heard:


• Store management takes the safety of Lowe’s customers and employees very seriously, so the company has store staff dedicated to monitoring and reporting severe weather situations when the National Weather Service releases warnings and watches.


• All 1,750 Lowe’s stores are also prepared to act in a worst-case scenario when severe weather or natural disasters hit stores. 


• Lowe’s also has an “Emergency Command Center” staffed 365 days a year dedicated to supporting stores before, during and after an emergency situation. The Lowe’s Emergency Command Center guides stores through crisis situations and the aftermath/cleanup phase.


Across North Carolina last month, a severe weekend of weather saw dozens of destructive tornadoes sweep across the state, which suffered 24 tornado-related deaths. Throughout the South, there were hundreds of deaths reported, while the property damage continues to be tallied. 


Lowe’s said it will eventually reopen the Sanford store. Until then, employees have been given jobs in other area stores. 


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