LUMBERYARDS

Chinese Drywall Complaint Center expands investigations

BY Ken Clark

The Chinese Drywall Complaint Center, a self-described consumer interest group, said it intends to expand its investigations involving toxic or defective imported Chinese-made building products. 

In a statement released yesterday, the group claimed the problem of defective drywall deserves more attention from the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission and President Obama. Also, the group raised concern over imported Chinese leather furniture.

"As a byproduct of their investigations involving toxic Chinese drywall, the group has determined there may be hundreds or thousands of other imported building products from China that are either toxic, defective or both," the group said.

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Congleton Lumber moving to new digs

BY Brae Canlen

Thanks, in part, to an expansion of a Jif peanut butter plant, Congleton Lumber is relocating into a new facility with a larger showroom in Lexington, Ky. John Congleton, who owns the fourth-generation lumberyard with his sister, told Home Channel News that when his next door neighbor, Jiff Peanut Butter, wanted to expand, “the offer was too good to refuse.”

Congleton Lumber’s customers, mostly remodelers plus a few high-end custom home builders, wanted the 105-year-old business to stay in downtown Lexington. So the owners found a vacant Habitat for Humanity ReStore a mile away. “The site and the building need a lot of work, but we have to be out of our location by Oct. 1,” Congleton said.

The new facility will have an expanded showroom that goes beyond stand-alone kitchen and bath displays. “We hope our showroom will display more products that are tied in together, so we can get involved in the project earlier, when the homeowners are still conceptualizing it,” Congleton said.

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In Dayton, Requarth Lumber merges with Supply One Cabinets

BY Ken Clark

The historic Requarth Lumber, a 151-year-old Dayton, Ohio, lumberyard that once sold lumber to Orville and Wilbur Wright, will merge with Supply One Cabinets and Design, according to a report in the Dayton Daily News.

The move is designed to generate business growth in a declining market. Alan Pippenger, president of Requarth, will remain president of the merged company as Supply One brings in a showroom to the lumberyard’s Dayton location on Monument Avenue.

The new showroom is expected to open in January, according to the news report.

Requarth was featured in the January 2010 issue of Home Channel News in a series of articles about business sustainability. In a prescient statement, Pippenger described adaptability as a key to long-term survival. "We aren’t the same company that we were 150, 100 or even 50 years ago," he told Home Channel News. "You have to be willing to give up on what’s not working anymore."

Pippenger told the newspaper that he was optimistic that the worst of the downturn is over.

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