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The challenge of collecting consumer information

BY HBSDEALER Staff

Consumers continue to be cautious about sharing their personal information, according to an online survey conducted by LoyaltyOne, a global provider of coalition loyalty, customer analytics and loyalty services.

Among 1,000 respondents surveyed, LoyaltyOne found that 78% of them do not feel they receive any benefit at all from sharing information, up from 74% in 2011; less than half feel that companies use their personal data to better serve the consumer, an 11% slip from 2011; and 62% said they would share more personal data if it meant receiving relevant product and service offers, down from 66% in 2011.

"These responses point to an unmistakable trend. Marketers’ efforts to create relevant customer experiences through data need to be re-addressed or they run the risk of their efforts not resonating with customers," LoyaltyOne president Bryan Pearson said. "Consumers are disappointed. For years they’ve provided their valuable information and they’re not realizing something of suitable worth in return. If businesses don’t act quickly to demonstrate they have the consumer’s best interest at heart, they risk an erosion of the business-to-consumer relationship." 

The survery also found that only 50% said they’d be willing to give a trusted company their religious affiliation, followed by their political affiliation and sexual orientation (both 49%), health information (36%), mental health information (26%), browsing history (24%) and smartphone location and number of sexual partners (tied at 15% each). Last on the list was their social security number (11%). 

For detailed results of the report, click here.

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Rolling Stones keyboardist weighs in on LEED

BY Brae Canlen

Almost everyone seems to have an opinion on which wood certifications should be accepted by the U.S. Green Building Council under its LEED rating system. One voice that recently emerged from the vox populi was Chuck Leavell, keyboardist for The Rolling Stones, who published a piece in Mother Nature Network praising Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal for expanding green building credits to include several wood certification systems.

“It’s time that SFI- and ATFS-certified lands get the recognition they deserve,” wrote Leavell, who owns and manages an ATFS-certified tree plantation near Macon, Ga. After making many of the familiar arguments against the current LEED standard, which recognizes only FSC-certified wood, Leavell urged the U.S. Green Building Council to be more inclusive during its current review of its LEED standards.

“Although LEED is making improvements that would allow more consideration and recognition of the environmental benefits of wood, much more needs to happen before the rest of these forest certification standards are fully integrated into LEED’s standards,” Leavell wrote.

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Orkin partners with insulation maker

BY Brae Canlen

GreenFiber, a cellulose insulation maker, has partnered with Orkin, the pest control company, to offer OrkinTherm, a product that offers both energy savings and insect protection. Home Depot will pilot the product at retail in select Texas stores beginning in September.

OrkinTherm is made from 85% recycled paper fibers and is then treated with a long-lasting pest control formula that helps protect against cockroaches, termites, ants and other species of intrusive pests. The product is certified by Energy Star and Scientific Certification Systems as energy efficient and EPA-registered for use around people, pets and the environment. While it’s recommended for use in attics, a common entry point in homes for pests, OrkinTherm also can be used in walls, the manufacturer said.

"Pests are always a problem, and if not properly treated, they can wreak havoc on the inside and outside of Texas homes," said Bruce Harned, director of marketing at GreenFiber. "Now, homeowners can purchase and install a solution to proactively protect homes against pests before problems arise.”

Homeowners looking to install OrkinTherm can visit the insulation aisle at select Home Depot stores across Texas and take advantage of free machine rentals with a minimum bag purchase. Installation assistance is also  available, as well as how-to instructions and videos on OrkinTherm’s website at orkintherm.com.

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