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CertainTeed plant noted for sustainability

BY HBSDEALER Staff

A CertainTeed roofing plant in Shreveport, La., recently strengthened the sustainability of its operations and achieved the globally recognized ISO 14001 certification. 

Developed by the International Organization for Standardization, ISO 14001 standards were created to help companies minimize their environmental impact and achieve continual improvement of its environmental performance. To secure the globally recognized certification, Valley Forge, Pa.-based CertainTeed developed a formalized environmental management system that underwent rigorous, third party evaluation.  

“ISO 14001 instills a culture of environmental responsibility and continuous improvement that maximizes the sustainability of our operations,” said Tom Smith, president of CertainTeed Roofing. “The Shreveport plant certification shows a superlative team effort and validates CertainTeed’s position as a leader in the development of sustainable building products that are manufactured with respect for the environment.” 

 

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Home channel employees praised on Capitol Hill

BY Brae Canlen

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky,), speaking on the floor of the U.S. Senate on tornado relief efforts last month, singled out several lumberyards and home-improvement retailers for their assistance in the aftermath of last month’s tornados. 

McConnell’s March 29 remarks, released by the Federal News Service, praised a number of individuals, groups and businesses who rendered aid in his home state. A series of severe tornados and funnel clouds took the lives of 24 Kentuckians. More than 300 people were injured, and many homes, churches, schools, and places of business were destroyed.

Restaurants, churches, television stations and even a soccer team stepped up with food, shelter, supplies, and volunteer hours. Among them, according to McConnell, were Knox Hardware and Pope’s Lumber, which donated work and cleaning supplies.

Several Home Depot stores in Kentucky and Indiana were also singled out.  District manager Becky Young and store manager Jim Householder coordinated donations of approximately $2,600. Householder’s employees were out immediately after the storm handing out paper towels, trash bags, and gloves to relief volunteers. Another district manager, Tim Choate, along with district human resource manager Lee Ann Bruce donated thousands of dollars’ worth of products such as chainsaws, gloves, respirators, tarps, water, and trash bags to organizations such as the Henryville Fire Department and local United Way chapters. Store employees volunteered to assist those organizations in the recovery.

Lowe’s stores in Kentucky pitched in with donations of gloves, tarps, shovels, bleach, and other supplies to communities across Kentucky. The North Carolina retailer donated more than $300,000 to relief efforts after the storms, McConnell said. Lowe’s district manager for Kentucky, Stephen West, dispatched a group of trained employees called “Lowe’s Heroes” who volunteer their time and construction expertise. 

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Big-ticket purchases: How consumers shop

BY Brae Canlen

Nearly seven out of 10 home improvement shoppers say they are not brand loyal when it comes to buying big-ticket items, according to a study conducted by The Integer Group, along with research partner Decision Analyst.

The category of products examined — major appliances, flooring, and windows and doors — can often span between three and 10 years between consumer purchases. Integer and Decision Analyst launched the study in early December and will be conducting it annually to better understand shopper motivations when it comes to purchases between $100 and $1,000.

Among the findings from the inaugural study were:

• Window/door and flooring shoppers both spend the greatest amount of time researching — often by retail site and not brand — before in-store shopping.

• The Internet is a critical channel for major appliance shoppers and can affect purchasing decisions at point of sale. It may even drive shoppers online to buy.

• Flooring shoppers researched products online an average of 6.72 times versus going to a store to shop; most shoppers averaged 3.89 in-store visits.

• Appliance shoppers are more likely to respond to a deal — but the new normal has them closely studying the real price/value equation of their purchase.

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