LUMBERYARDS

California lumberyard damaged by fire

BY HBSDealer Staff

Sparks from a panel saw may have caused approximately $85,000 worth of damage to a Northern California lumberyard, according to an article in the Marin Independent Journal.

Fire trucks were called to San Rafael Lumber and Building Supply at 2:45 a.m. on Feb. 10, the newspaper reported, and found a large amount of construction material on the exterior of the main structure ablaze. The fire had also moved into an office display area attached to the main building.

Investigators believe that an electrical malfunction of a panel saw sent sparks into adjacent wood shaving, sawdust and other combustible material.

Some 35 firefighters were involved in the putting out the blaze. Damage was estimated at $50,000 to structures and $35,000 to inventory and contents. The main building was protected by an overhead fire sprinklers. 

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Made-in-the-USA profiles: The builder

BY Ken Ryan

What began quite innocently as a pet project turned into a national movement for Anders Lewendal, the Bozeman, Mont., builder who has since gained wide acclaim for constructing a house made entirely from U.S.-made products.

Initially, Lewendal set out to build an “efficient, affordable and environmentally healthy” home for a client whose daughter has cystic fibrosis. In researching the building materials and parts required for the project, Lewendal was struck with this idea: Why not go for all-American parts and materials.

The U.S.-made house was built with more than 120 products from 33 states. Everything from the nails, screws and bolts, to the steel, staples and bathtub was made in the U.S. Even the dishwasher – a Whirlpool product – was made at a U.S. factory. 

In the end, the only product Lewendal said he could not find from U.S. sources was a door chime. His solution? A doorknocker, which was made in America.

Chris Ogle, purchasing manager at Kenyon Noble Lumber & Hardware, Bozeman, Mont., provided the vast majority of building materials for Lewendal’s project.  “We were surprised at how many building materials are made in the U.S., although it’s not something we had ever really monitored before,” Ogle said.

The most difficult product to find was drywall screws, according to Ogle, who eventually tracked down a Nevada distributor.

The Bozeman-centered “Made in the U.S.A.” project struck a chord. Lewendal was featured in scores of  newspaper and magazine articles, as well as a segment on ABC World News with Diane Sawyer, in which a reporter and film crew followed Lewendal throughout the process.

By Lewendal’s account, 30 million people have heard about the “Made in the USA” project either through the media or Internet searches. “I never thought it would grow to this point, but I’m glad it did,” he said. “This is an exercise we hope will manifest itself into a movement.” 

Lewendal does not build every house with American-made parts. That would not be feasible. What he is seeking is incremental change. “I think we could solve this recession if everyone shifted just 5 percent of their purchases to U.S.-made products,” he said.

Lewendal scoffs at the notion there is no manufacturing left in the U.S. “What I’ve learned is there’s a lot of value in American companies,” he said.

He is not alone in that thinking. Kenyon Noble has been similarly moved by the Made in the U.S.A. experience. “It was an eye-opening project for all involved, a worthwhile effort,” Ogle said. “Since then, we have directed our purchasing managers to look into buying more products from American-made companies.”

 

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s.lelejaleaja says:
May-20-2012 09:06 am

I am interested in this topic
I am interested in this topic and would like to find out some more information as my friend need information on this topic. Do you have any other articles about this? Jim

R.REASBECK says:
Feb-13-2012 11:59 pm

Great coverage on this house
Great coverage on this house that is setting the standard. I'm doing my part, I created a website for Made-in-USA Products www.USAonly.US . With over 25 years in the window business, I know the up's and down's of what it means to be in the construction trades. The video for Ander's house is posted on the home page. The only way we get our economy back is to support American Manufacturers , buy local and step away from the imported stuff. With almost 1000 companies , my site lists companies by CATEGORY, by STATE OF ORIGIN, by ALPHABET,and by WORD SEARCH. Every time we add a company we post the number of employed Americans. So as of today, 47,291 folks depend on making a living by supporting the companies on www.USAonly.US . Please check out the site and help, "GET AMERICA BACK IN BUSINESS"

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BlueLinx partners with Weyerhaeuser in New England

BY Brae Canlen

Atlanta building products distributor BlueLinx has announced an agreement with Weyerhaeuser to become the independent distributor of Weyerhaeuser’s engineered wood products in New England, including Trus Joist, TJI joist, TimberStrand LSL, Microllam LVL, Parallam PSL and TJ Rim board. The agreement is effective Feb. 13, 2012.

"We used a rigorous process to select our New England distributor," said Jeff Rettig, Weyerhaeuser region manager for the Northeast. "BlueLinx emerged as the best fit for this market based on its operational capabilities, alignment with our local strategy, and strong reputation and relationship with our current New England customer base."

The agreement applies to the New England market and does not impact BlueLinx’s strategy or approach in other markets, the company said. The New England market is defined as Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and upstate New York. As a distributor of building products in many regions across North America, BlueLinx currently operates four facilities in the New England market with distribution centers in Bellingham, Mass.; Portland, Maine; Burlington, Vt.; and Buffalo, N.Y.

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