HARDWARE STORES

Australian hardware stores dig in

BY Ken Clark

An article in Smart Company of Australia describes theories on independent success in the face of a new super chain.

Things are different in Australia, where the big boxes account for a mere 25% of the home improvement business, as opposed to a 75% share in the United States. But according to Retail Doctor Group managing director Brian Walker, recommendation No. 1 is a familiar phrase: Focus on service.

Australian retailer Woolworths and U.S.-based Lowe’s are rolling out a home improvement brand called Masters.

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HARDWARE STORES

Owners retire, store closes

BY Ken Clark

The Chicago Daily Herald has reported that Marlowe’s Ace Hardware in Hampshire, Ill., is closing as its owners enter retirement.

Dean and Marge Marlowe have owned the location in downtown Hampshire for 31 years. The State Street store has sold hardware since the 1890s and has been under the ownership of five different families during that time, according to the article

While the Marlowes would prefer to see the business continue as a hardware store, the couple’s three children are not following their parents into the industry.

Efforts to sell the store to prospective buyers have been stymied partly by the banks unwillingness to issue mortgages to the buyers, according to the article. 

The store is expected to close at the end of November.

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N.Pasquine says:
Oct-08-2012 09:11 pm

Isn't this confusing. Buyers
Isn't this confusing. Buyers can't get financing to buy a long established small business.....but Obama said...........add it to the list of his lies.

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HARDWARE STORES

Florida hardware store closing after six decades

BY Brae Canlen

Knotts Hardware, a Tampa, Fla., area hardware store, shut down for good on Oct. 12, according to an article in The Tampa Tribune. Johnny Knotts, whose grandfather Ben founded the store in the 1950s, blamed a poor economy, competition from home improvement chain stores and declining commercial accounts.

The business, located on Main Street in Plant City, Fla., once served commercial customers from phosphate mines and factories. Retail business began to decline as customers moved to suburban shopping centers, Knotts said.

"I feel like I’m letting my grandfather’s dream die,” said the 52-year-old. “For a long time I was in denial. But I had to face the hard truth that it’s time to close."

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