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3M launches ‘Go To’ industrial masking tapes

BY HBSDealer Staff

3M is Making Masking Simple.

The company’s new line includes 3M Value Masking Tape 101+ for basic jobs such as marking, temporarily holding, wrapping and sealing; 3M General Use Masking Tape 201+ for everyday jobs like bundling, labeling and identifying; 3M Performance Yellow Masking Tape 301+ for industrial paint masking, bundling, color coding and sealing; 3M High Performance Green Masking Tape 401+/233+ for high-performance industrial painting of aircraft, buses, trailers, trucks, boats, trains and other specialty vehicles; and 3M Specialty High Temperature Masking Tape 501+ for the highest degree of industrial performance in high temperature paint baking applications.

“Choosing an industrial masking tape should be simple,” said Matthew Van Vleet, U.S. product manager at 3M. “Customers need to have confidence that they’re using the right level of performance for the job.” To make this happen, 3M is proud to launch a new lineup of five industrial masking tapes — 101+, 201+, 301+, 401+ and 501+ — built on increasing levels of performance and engineered to perform in most all industrial jobs that require a masking tape.

According to Van Vleet, 3M’s new five-tape system is designed to help customers choose the right level of performance for the job. With the new lineup of 3M Masking Made Simple tapes, performance levels will be easy to determine.

For more information, visit 3M.com/maskingmadesimple.

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Senate approves Internet sales tax; opposition looms in House

BY HBSDEALER Staff

The U.S. Senate on late Monday approved the long-debated Internet sales tax proposal, known as the Marketplace Fairness Act, by a bipartisan vote of 69 to 27. The Obama administration has already endorsed the bill, but before it can become law it must be approved by the House, where Republicans are split on the bill.

The legislation would allow the 45 states (and the District of Columbia) that currently charge sales taxes to require large online retailers to collect tax on purchases made by their residents. While some House Republicans have expressed support for the measure, others view it another tax increase on consumers or express fear it would overburden Internet businesses in their states. 

The Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) issued the following statement in response to the Senate vote to pass the legislation, which it described as  aimed at giving states the power — if they so choose — to better enforce their sales tax laws and to level the playing field for Main Street merchants. 

The legislation, sponsored by Senators Mike Enzi (R-WY) Richard Durbin (D-IL), Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), passed the Senate by more than a two to one margin.

“The Senate’s overwhelmingly bipartisan passage of this legislation foreshadows the end of the special treatment of big online businesses at the expense of retailers on Main Street,” said Bill Hughes, senior VP government affairs. “After such a resounding vote in the Senate, we look forward to a constructive debate in the House to level the playing field for all retailers this year.”

“For too long the Main Street retailers that are an integral part of their communities have faced tax rules that put them at a disadvantage to their out of state, online-only competitors. The Senate has voted to ensure that the market, not government, determines winners and losers,” Hughes continued. “We are confident the House will reach the same conclusion."

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Readers Respond: Getting the lead out

BY HBSDEALER Staff

The following letters were in response to an article about reform of the EPA’s Lead: Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule.

Lead paint rule and the opt-out provision:

“Why the industry even bothers to humor the EPA is beyond me.  Let the private property owner be responsible for his own ‘pollution.’  If he harms his neighbor, then he’s responsible for the consequences whether financial or otherwise.”
— Charles Veazey, Boulia-Gorrell Lumber, Laconia, N.H.

“As a sales consultant working in the window installation business for an EPA-certified contractor, I average 850 appointments per year. I can assure you here in Connecticut, the opt-out rule would be exercised by 75% of my clients who do not have young children in the home. Therefore, I agree the opt-out rule would save valuable time for my installers and money for my customers. Bring it back!”
— Name withheld

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